TradeMark

What Is trademark

A trademark is a distinctive sign that identifies certain goods or services produced or provided by an individual or a company. Its origin dates back to ancient times when craftsmen reproduced their signatures, or "marks", on their artistic works or products of a functional or practical nature. Over the years, these marks have evolved into today's system of trademark registration and protection The system helps consumers to identify and purchase a product or service based on whether its specific characteristics and quality - as indicated by its unique trademark -meet their needs.

 

What do trademarks do?

Trademark protection ensures that the owners of marks have the exclusive right to use them to identify goods or services, or to authorize others to use them in return for payment The period of protection varies, but a trademark can be renewed indefinitely upon payment of the corresponding fees Trademark protection is legally enforced by courts that, in most systems, have the authority
to stop trademark infringement In a larger sense, trademarks promote initiative and enterprise worldwide by rewarding their owners with recognition and financial profit Trademark protection also hinders the efforts of unfair competitors, such as counterfeiters, to use similar distinctive signs to market inferior or different products or services. The system enables people with
skill and enterprise to produce and market goods and services in the fairest possible conditions, thereby facilitating International trade

 

What kinds of trademarks can be registered?

Trademarks may be one or a combination of words, letters and numerals. They may consist of drawings, symbols or three- dimensional signs, such as the shape and packaging of goods.
In some countries, non-traditional marks may be registered for distinquishinq features such as holograms, motion, color and non-visible signs (sound, smell or taste)

 

In addition to identifying the commercial source of goods or services, several other trademark categories also exist Collective marks are owned by an association whose members use them to indicate products with a certain level of quality and who agree to adhere to specific requirements set by the association. Such associations might represent, for example, accountants, engineers or architects. Certification marks are given for compliance with defined standards but are not confined to any membership.

They may be granted to anyone who can certify that their products meet certain established standards Some examples of recognized certification are the internationally accepted "ISO 9000" quality standards and Ecolabels
for products with reduced environmental Impact.

 

How is a trademark registered?

First, an application for registration of a trademark must be filed with the appropriate national or regional trademark office The application must contain a clear reproduction of the sign flied for registration, including any colors, forms or three-dimensional features It must also contain a list

 

of the goods or services to which the sign would apply. The sign must fulfill certain conditions in order to be protected as a trademark or other type of mark. It must be distinctive, so that consumers can distinguish it from trademarks identilyinq other products, as well as Identify a particular product with it It must neither mislead nor deceive customers nor violate public order or morality.

 

Finally, the rights applied for cannot be the same as, or similar to, rights already granted to another trademark owner. This may be determined through search and examination by national
offices, or by the opposition of third parties who claim to have similar or Identical rights

 

 

How extensive is trademark protection?

 

Almost all countries in the world register and protect trademarks. Each national 01 regional office maintains a Register of Trademarks containing full application information on all registrations and renewals, which facilitates examination, search and potential opposition by third parties. The effects of the registration are, however, limited to the country (or, in the case of regional registration, countries) concerned

 

To avoid the need to register separate applications with each national or regional office, WIPO administers an international registration system for trademarks The system is governed by two treaties the Madrid Agreement Concerninq the International Registration of Marks and the Madrid Protocol Persons with a link (be it through nationality, domicile or establishment) to a country party to one or both of these treaties may, on the basis of a registration or application with the trademark office of that country (or related region), obtain an international registration having effect in some or all of the other countries of the Madrid Union.